Prescott Center for the Arts, Prescott AZ

Entering it's 8th remarkable year, and growing in leaps and bounds, PCA's Readers Theatre program is back for another great year of telling diverse stories in the simplest of theatrical fashions. It's the actors, the audiene and the WORDS painting emotional images in the minds of the audience. 

  Readers Theater  

Reader's Theatre is Admission Free

A Suggested $5 Donation is Great Appreciated


2015 - 2016

In its 8th Season!

The Readers Theatre Program will expand again in the 2013 - 2014 Season. The program will return to Prescott Valley Library and Chino Valley at the Senior Center.  Thank you to both of these hosts for assisting us in our quest to make high-quality theatre available to more people in the Quad-cities area. 



By Peter Shaffer

November 5 - 7 at 7pm in Stage Too  

Nov 7 at PVL   Nov 8 at CV Sr. Ctr.  

Directed by Parker Anderson

Lettice Duffet, an expert on Elizabethan cuisine and medieval weaponry, is an indefatigable but daffy enthusiast of history and the theatre. As a tour guide at Fustian House, one of the least stately of London's stately homes, she theatrically embellishes its historical past, ultimately coming up on the radar of Lotte Schon, an inspector from the Preservation Trust. Neither impressed or entertained by Lettice's freewheeling history lessons, Schon fires her. Not one however, to go without a fight, Lettice engages the stoic, conventionial Lotte in battle to the death of all that is sacred to the Empire and the crown. This hit by the author of Equus and Amadeus featured a triumphant award-winning performance by Dame Maggie Smith in London and on Broadway. 



   The Housekeeper  

By James Prideaux

Jan 7, 8, 9 at 7pm in Stage Too  

Jan 9 at PVL   Jan 10 at CV Sr. Ctr. 

Directed by Carl Kennedy

Foundering a bit after the death of his aged (and domineering) mother, Manley Carstairs, a self-styled literary artist, engages a housekeeper, Annie Dankworth, to look after his large Victorian house (and himself). When Annie first arrives, wearing sneakers and carrying her belongings in a grocery cart, Manley is taken aback, but she seems so eager to please that he relents—after which their relationship progresses rapidly from initial reserve to active hatred. Annie is one of the world's great oddballs. She insults her employer, denigrates his writing, admits she forged her references, accuses Manley of lusting after her and, in general, makes his life a hell. Eventually Manley can take no more, but when he advances on Annie with strangulation in mind, he trips, falls into her arms, they embrace, and the rest is history. Conveyed in a series of fast-paced, juxtaposed scenes—some in the present, some in the past—the play covers all these unlikely events with lively wit and biting humor, becoming funnier and funnier as it builds toward its unexpected and thoroughly delightful conclusion.




Talented Readers Theatre cast members deliver the dialogue using vocal intonation, facial expression and limited physical movement, with scripts in hand.  On a professional level, many playwrights and/or composers and lyricists of musicals hold similar readings of their work for potential financial backers. Directors look upon this form of theatre as a way to broaden their ability to reach out and “test the waters” in different styles of theatre and/or bring stories which, for various reasons, may not be suitable or logistically possilble to produce on stage.




By David Mamet

June 2 - 4 at 7pm and

June 4 & 5 at 2pm in Stage Too   

Directed by Rob White

This scalding comedy took Broadway and London by storm. Here is Mamet at his very best, writing about small-time, cutthroat real estate salesmen trying to grind out a living by pushing plots of land on reluctant buyers in a never-ending scramble for their share of the American dream. Revived on Broadway in 2005 and 2012, this masterpiece of American drama also became a celebrated film which starred Al Pacino, Jack Lemmon, Alec Baldwin and Alan Arkin.

"Crackling tension… ferocious comedy and drama." - The New York Times

"Wonderfully funny… A play to see, remember and cherish." - New York Post

Winner! 1984 Pulitzer Prize for Drama
Winner! 1983 Olivier Award, Best New Play
Winner! 1984 New York Drama Critics' Circle, Best American Play
Winner! 2005 Tony Award, Best Revival of a Play